Recommended daily reading – 3 October (weekend clean up edition)

Away from my feeds for a few days, but here are a few selections:

Two ‘old news’ items, but still worth pointing to. First, via Comics Alliance, apparently David E. Kelley is set to write a new Wonder Woman TV series. I haven’t watched a Kelley show in ages, and I can’t decide if he will bring a refreshing perspective to the source material or if this will turn out to be a creative mismatch. As with speculation around the unmade WW movie, it seems that who ends up in the lead role will mean a lot to whether this works or not as much as who is running things behind the scenes.

Second, last week was Banned Books Week and Robot 6 points to a list of the ‘most challenged’ comics. Most are pretty easy to imagine being challenged by someone, but Bone? Really?

Also coming late, a report on OM’s Champions League loss to (ack) Chelsea (who also took down Arsenal today).

Torontoist has a story about Gould Street on the Ryerson University campus a pedestrian-only zone for at least a year. Anne-Marie and I were in this area of Toronto regularly when we went to TIFF in 2007. I also would like to see more major cities with designated no-car zones.

Lastly, the final four panels of this ComicCritics are hilariously true for anyone who knows Alan Moore and his attitudes towards DC.

Recommended daily reading – 16 September

Another short set:

To begin, a note from the GraphicNovelReporter about Neil Gaiman appearing on the PBS animated kids show, Arthur. I mention this in part because of Gaiman – and I can’t believe that today is the first day I have used the tag “NeilGaiman” on delicious – but also because when Anne-Marie and I lived in the sort of granny flat at her parents for a period after my Ph.D. we watched a lot of PBS kids shows, including Arthur. There probably aren’t that many authors who can mean something to the main audience for Arthur and fill a big hall at Comic-Con.

Second, is this article from In These Times about the company, Righthaven, which is helping the Las Vegas Review-Journal file lawsuits against bloggers and community organizations for alleged copyright violations for using the paper’s articles or excerpts of their articles on their websites. One informant in the article describes the company as a ‘lawsuit mill’. However it is described, Righthaven seems to represent the worst excesses of American copyright law on the side of corporate rights holders/claimants.

And lastly, just to show that I am not a frontrunning fan, is OM.net’s article on Marseille’s loss to Spartak in the Champions League.