Recommended daily reading – 15 March (got links edition)

End of the term, so the link compiling has been slow, but here are some good pointers:

On her Reassigned Time 2.0 blog, Dr, Crazy has an entry on what it means to teach a 4/4 load. She notes that most graduate school experiences prepare people for the R1 research track, and its corresponding 2/2 or lighter teaching. From that perspective, teaching 4/4 seems like an impossible burden on “one’s own” work. Crazy argues that this is a particularly blinkered way of seeing the kind of work that most PhDs are likely to find themselves doing, and lists a number of teaching and research strategies she has developed to be satisfied in her position, however far removed it might be from the grad school ideal.

In my comment to her post, I note that Western is on quarters, which turns 4/4 into 3/3/3, but in either case, I think her reflection is valuable for what it says about what working at a small, undergraduate teaching focused public university is not, and keeping the relationship between teaching and research in perspective. (I should note that her post is in response to this short piece by Notorious PhD).

Two entries on Guy Davis leaving as the regular artist on B.P.R.D. One, by Sean Collins on Robot 6, looks at seven of the best moments from Davis’ work on the title (the choice of seven is explained in the post, but should be easy to figure out if you read Hellboy and B.P.R.D.). The other is by Andy Khouri at ComicsAlliance and looks ahead to new artist Tyler Crook, about whom I know little.

From The Mary Sue, two items about art created by young girls. Jamie Frevele points to a hand drawn “video game”, and includes a link to an audio file where the kid explains her design. And, also from Frevele, is a series of photos showing some neat little hand painted rocks inspired by Exit through the Gift Shop.

Via Inside Higher Ed is this short item quoting Steve Jobs on Apple and the integration of technology with the liberal arts and humanities. No comment, just find this thought interesting.

Finally, I have been looking at the work at Moviebarcode for a couple of weeks now, and I am still not sure what to make of this art. This piece, which is Wong Kar Wai’s In the Mood for Love, one of the three films I will cite as my favorite, is what moved me to post about the project.

On the one hand, I can see where these images could make lovely prints, blown up and framed. On the other hand, they are given the same title as the films they concentrate. What of In the Mood for Love is in the image? Would I know that this is that film without being told? Sometimes when I look at it, I see colors and partial figures that evoke the movie. At other times, I see little connection, leading me to think that this is an interesting formal exercise, but it is, fundamentally, separate from cinema.

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Recommended daily reading – 7 December (finals week edition)

A few notes as I await the deluge of papers:

On Reassigned Time 2.0, Dr. Crazy has a personal view on why she is not interested in moving from faculty to administration. I can only say, “yes”, to what she writes, but I also appreciate how she manages to explain her own thoughts and feelings without tearing down those who are interested in becoming department chairs, or even moving higher up in the hierarchy. I should add that I have to be department chair in geography every six years or so, but the kind of position Crazy is writing about is more akin to what are “division chairs” at Western. Department chair is not a ‘real’ administrative position at my school, and like most faculty, in geography we just rotate every two years and everyone takes a turn. There are certain pieces of paper we have to sign, we are often the first contact for potential majors and minors, etc., but we are mostly interlocuters for the actual administrators than we are administrators ourselves.

Following up on my last Recommended daily reading post, I notice that the current focus on the humanities as a place to cut back on higher education budgets is continuing to get push back, which is heartening. Inside Higher Ed notes a campaign in Ireland to see the humanities as a tool for economic growth, while at Crooked Timber is an announcement of Dutch-government funded initiatives in inter- and multi-disciplinary programs in the humanities.

On Robot 6 is a discussion of Creative Commons and comic book characters. I am encouraged to see comic book creators thinking about these issues. Given the economics of comics, and how readily the medium lends itself to digital, it probably isn’t a surprise that writers and artists in the field would be out in front on thinking about copyright in nuanced ways.

And last, two drawings from Renee French, a nervous looking rodent and a sort of Cthulu-like character.

Recommended daily reading – 1 December (a new month edition)

A few items I have collected:

At Inside Higher Education is a debate about the value of the humanities that begins with Gregory Petsko’s open letter to SUNY-Albany’s president, George Phillip, regarding his announcement of cuts to various language and arts departments. Petsko makes the case for the humanities as valuable to a variety of life paths, and not just in reference to a specific job or career track, and also argues for the university’s role in ‘preserving knowledge’ as well as training for the present. The comments, of course, are interesting, too, Petsko seems to have his own private troll, and then there is this puzzling follow-up from University of Illinois English lecturer, Kristin Wilcox. I write ‘puzzling’ because, as a few commenters point out, Wilcox, while appreciating Petsko’s defense of the humanities, also sees his perspective as naive, but she does not directly suggest how the humanities should be valued if not in the way that Petsko argues.

On Written World is a pointed comment on a recent discussion of Jessica Alba’s performance in Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer, where Alba was directed to “be prettier” when she cried. Alba expressed some anguish at being told to be less ‘real’ in her performance, and more like the object of beauty the director and producers had in mind then they cast her. This story is interesting for how keenly aware of her objectification Alba is, I think many would assume that she would not be, and also because the critique at Written World of the response to her is clear and incisive.

Two items of cool: (via Robot 6) a This American life poster reproducing a panel from the Nation X comics, and this ‘cinematic’ wallpaper at BLDGBLOG.