Recommended daily reading – 19 October

Hey, two days in a row:

First, a quick report on Arsenal’s dismantling of Shakhtar Donetsk in the Champions League today.

From the world of webcomics, John Allison starts a news series featuring Esther from Scary Go Round (yaye!), and ComicCritics takes on APE in a strip featuring Shannon Wheeler and Too Much Coffee Man.

Finally, I may find the time to do my own Mad Men review, but in the meantime, Daynah Burnett at PopMatters considers Sunday’s finale to be a brilliant close to a season marked by “dark ideas”, while Amanda Marcotte on Pandagon sees it as a mess of an episode that, among other things, seems to duck the abortion question for Joan.

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Recommended daily reading – 18 October (mid-day, better late than never edition)

A few things I have collected over the past several days:

First, a recent Radio Open Source podcast with Harvard History Professor, Jill Lepore talking about her book, The Whites of Their Eyes, which puts the current ‘Tea Party Revolution’ in historical perspective. The interview is seriously entertaining and Lepore is smart and engaging.

Next, via Anne-Marie on delicious, is Overthinkingit’s “Female Character Flow Chart”, which guides readers through a set of criteria that can be used to distinguish ‘strong’ women characters in prose, comics, film and television (and maybe video games). Illustrated with examples.

On Top Shelf 2.0 is a short, funny play on Greek/Roman mythology and social media from Erik Bergstrom.

Last Saturday was Arsene Wenger’s 800th game with Arsenal (a 2-1 win over Birmingham City).

Finally, yes, this would be cool (via MTV’s Splashpage).

Recommended daily reading – 3 October (weekend clean up edition)

Away from my feeds for a few days, but here are a few selections:

Two ‘old news’ items, but still worth pointing to. First, via Comics Alliance, apparently David E. Kelley is set to write a new Wonder Woman TV series. I haven’t watched a Kelley show in ages, and I can’t decide if he will bring a refreshing perspective to the source material or if this will turn out to be a creative mismatch. As with speculation around the unmade WW movie, it seems that who ends up in the lead role will mean a lot to whether this works or not as much as who is running things behind the scenes.

Second, last week was Banned Books Week and Robot 6 points to a list of the ‘most challenged’ comics. Most are pretty easy to imagine being challenged by someone, but Bone? Really?

Also coming late, a report on OM’s Champions League loss to (ack) Chelsea (who also took down Arsenal today).

Torontoist has a story about Gould Street on the Ryerson University campus a pedestrian-only zone for at least a year. Anne-Marie and I were in this area of Toronto regularly when we went to TIFF in 2007. I also would like to see more major cities with designated no-car zones.

Lastly, the final four panels of this ComicCritics are hilariously true for anyone who knows Alan Moore and his attitudes towards DC.

Recommended daily reading – 28 September (cleaning up edition)

Some selections from the past few days:

Comics Alliance is featuring a teaser for an animated short film of Atomic Robo and a view of the animation process. Robo is one of my favorite titles right now, and this certainly looks cool, and clearly made by people who are fans.

In other comics adaptations news, MTV’s Splash Page has some interesting discussion with Joss Whedon about the opportunities and challenges of directing The Avengers.

Champions League today, and Arsenal earns another win, this time over Partizan Belgrade.

Finally, renee french has a truly strange rodent for your consideration.

Recommended daily reading – 16 September

Another short set:

To begin, a note from the GraphicNovelReporter about Neil Gaiman appearing on the PBS animated kids show, Arthur. I mention this in part because of Gaiman – and I can’t believe that today is the first day I have used the tag “NeilGaiman” on delicious – but also because when Anne-Marie and I lived in the sort of granny flat at her parents for a period after my Ph.D. we watched a lot of PBS kids shows, including Arthur. There probably aren’t that many authors who can mean something to the main audience for Arthur and fill a big hall at Comic-Con.

Second, is this article from In These Times about the company, Righthaven, which is helping the Las Vegas Review-Journal file lawsuits against bloggers and community organizations for alleged copyright violations for using the paper’s articles or excerpts of their articles on their websites. One informant in the article describes the company as a ‘lawsuit mill’. However it is described, Righthaven seems to represent the worst excesses of American copyright law on the side of corporate rights holders/claimants.

And lastly, just to show that I am not a frontrunning fan, is OM.net’s article on Marseille’s loss to Spartak in the Champions League.