May Comics

From tfaw this month:

Single issue:

Short takes:

  • Annihilators #3 (Marvel). Rocket Raccoon rules. Super powerful super beings trying to best each other is fun when done with style and in a good nature. Nice work so far to Dan Abnett, Andy Lanning, Tan Eng Huat, and Timothy Green et al for this mini.
  • Atomic Robo: Deadly Art of Science #5 (Red 5). Conclusion to the latest series, which is, if nothing else, indicative of how solid Brian Clevinger’s and Scott Wegener’s work, with Ronda Patterson and Jeff Powell, has become on this title. Funny. Smart. Action. Science. One of the most reliable reads I pull.
  • Avengers Academy #12, Avengers Academy: Giant Size #1, Avengers Academy #13 (Marvel). This trio of issues seems to have reignited A’s enthusiasm for this series. On the other hand, the “Giant Size” issue and #13 seem like stories that would have meant more before Young Allies was canceled.
  • Birds of Prey #11 (DC). A Secret Six/BoP crossover issue. Would hardly deny Gail Simone that conceit. Always like to see Helena/Huntress anchor a story.
  • B.P.R.D.: The Dead Remembered #2 (Dark Horse). This mini is developing some thoughtful character background for Liz that highlights the extent to which she is both of a generic type and distinctive at the same time. Looking forward to seeing how the historical piece is brought into the present and intertwined with Liz’s story.
  • Carbon Grey #2 (Image). The most helpful thing about this issue is the narrative summary on the inside cover. Still long on style.
  • Casanova: Gula #4 (Marvel Icon). Matt Fraction brings this arc to a gender bending conclusion (and maybe is an exception that proves the rule regarding what I write about Age of X below). Crazy James Bond-ish backup with Gabriel Ba in addition to the main story.
  • Hellboy: Buster Oakley Gets His Wish (Dark Horse). Mike Mignola adds alien abduction to the Hellboy-verse. I would like to see Kevin Nowlan on other Hellboy stories. I like that his lines are stronger than Mignola’s or Duncan Fegredo, and his figures more “realistic”, but that his Hellboy is still an homage to the character’s classic look: lanky and geometric.
  • I, Zombie #13 (DC/Vertigo). A is still enjoying this book with me, but maybe finding it harder to track as the narrative deepens. A new arc starts here, but one that builds on prior foundations. Need to wait-and-see where “The Dead Presidents” characters are headed.
  • The Li’l Depressed Boy #3 (Image). Most disappointing thing about this book so far is that A continues to resist reading it. Other than that, I am still impressed at how well Steven Struble and Sin Grace stay on the right side of the Nice Guy and the Manic Pixie Dream Girl with the two lead characters.
  • Generation Hope #6 (Marvel). Fast start to a new arc.
  • The New York Five #4 (DC/Vertigo). Done too soon.
  • S.H.I.E.L.D. Infinity (Marvel). In which Jonathan Hickman fills in some historical background to the vast story he is writing with this book. Dustin Weaver takes a break except for the cover.
  • Silver Surfer #3 (Marvel). Serves as a key turning point in the story.
  • Sir Edward Grey, Witchfinder #4 (Dark Horse). Zombies, demon dogs, a novel take on colonization of native peoples in North America. A good story.
  • Uncanny X-Force #7, #8, and #9 (Marvel). A tentative conclusion to the Weapon X/Deathlok/The World story and a couple of one-offs about personal demons (Betsy and Warren) and how things change (Magneto and Wolverine). Billy Tan works to maintain the high standard of the book, but he and Dean White’s art in #9 is more photo real than I would like to see, especially on a title that benefits from more expressionism in how it is drawn and colored.
  • Uncanny X-Men #535 and #536 (Marvel). Cool to read Kieron Gillen picking up on Joss Whedon’s Astonishing X-Men story, especially as a way to deal with Kitty’s return. Terry and Rachel Dodson are much welcomed after too, too much Greg Land.
  • Wolverine and Jubilee #4 (Marvel). Kathryn Immonen and Phil Noto bring their mini to close with some nice character moments and a story that tracks despite looking like it might have just been weird.
  • X-Men: Prelude to Schism #1 (Marvel). All prelude and build-up, which, I guess, is all that is promised, no?
  • Spider-Girl #6 and X-23 #9 (Marvel). Playing out the string with these titles. Who knows, maybe moving Jubilee and Noto to X-23 will make me change my mind about pulling that book.

Longer takes:

  • Age of X: Chapter 5 (X-Men Legacy #247), Age of X: Chapter 6 (New Mutants #24), and Age of X Universe #2 (Marvel). I suppose that it is inevitable that they pay off for these kinds of stories is never as exciting as the set up. Having written that, Mike Carey did excellent work in plotting out the story and letting unfold in a way that made sense and that told you something about the alternate universe in which the action takes place. The Universe books with The Avengers could have been better integrated into the main story. I’m not sure they tell you much of interest. What I would have liked to see is more stories like the Dazzler backup by Chuck Kim and Gabriel Hernandez Walta, which is interesting for the way it does integrate mutant and non-mutant elements of the construct in Legion’s brain, but also for the distinct art style.
  • I plan to address Angel #44, Angel: 100-Page Spectacular, Spike #7 and Spike #8 in a longer post on the IDW Angelverse.

TPBs:

DMZ Volume 10: Collective Punishment (DC/Vertigo).

Forthcoming.

Empire State: A Love Story (or Not) (Abrams). Jason Shiga’s new book is a charming work that spins the Nice Guy character by actually having him grow and making his love interest a fully actualized person with her own ideas about life. The different hues for the different lines of the narrative is an effective way to show Jimmy’s development at different stages of the story. Shiga’s art is, as always, highly expressive.

Neptune (Tug Boat Press).

Forthcoming.

Page by Paige (Amulet). I ordered Laura Lee Gulledge’s book because I thought it would be a good one to share with A, but I learned after the fact that she already had an advance copy that Anne-Marie picked up from ALA last year. So, we kind of did get to share, but not at the same time. In any event, it is hard not be drawn into Paige’s world. I appreciate how Gulledge keeps the story on the right side of sweet and precious; it seems perfect for the character. I am still thinking over many of the visual metaphors, which alternate between subtle and beautiful and pretty but ham handed. If these are meant to be Paige’s, that kind of unevenness seems appropriate. If they are meant for the reader, then that requires more assessment, I think. On the other hand, I know that it isn’t easy to come up with metaphoric imagery. In any case, a delightful book.

Secret Six: The Reptile Brain (DC).

Forthcoming.

Sleepyheads (Blank Slate Books).

Forthcoming.

Tiny Titans: Field Trippin’ (DC).

No longer the blast of pure joy it used to be, but still lots of fun. As always some of the best jokes involve parodies of the goings on in the real DCU. B’DG is adorable.

From Matt’s Cavalcade of Comics:

Rated Free for Everyone (Oni Press). One of two Free Comic Book Day offerings that I picked up from Oni. Both titles featured here have plenty of style, but not the kind of characters or stories that can still appeal to me as a an adult. I am thinking my nephew might like one or the other, though.

Spontaneous #1 (Oni Press). The more adult of the Oni titles for Free Comic Book Day. Brett Weldele’s art is plenty stylish, but Joe Harris’ story not quite enough of substance for me to decide to pull this one. Trade/wait, I think.

Top Shelf Kids Club (Top Shelf). Fun. Fun. Fun. Works in ways that the Oni all ages book doesn’t. Another great Johnny Boo from James Kolchaka, and I always enjoy having a reason to see another of Christian Slade’s Korgi and Andy Runton’s Owly.

The Dead Boy Detectives (DC/Vertigo).

Forthcoming.

Jenny Finn: Doom Messiah (BOOM! Studios).

A title I’ve thought about reading and would pick up a lot and finally did purchase on Free Comic Book Day. Looks and feels like an out of place B.P.R.D. or Hellboy mini, which is to say that it is pulp-y fun, but I will admit to hoping for something … different. My biggest problem, though, is with the lettering in chapters 1-2, which is tiny.

From comiXology:

Madman: Oddity #1 and #2 (Image). Don’t know why I’ve overlooked this awesomeness from Michael Allred before, but I am happy that it is available digitally for me to read. Crazy, but low-key, existential fun and wry commentary on superheroes. More when I finish the mini.

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April comics

From tfaw last month:

Single issues:

Quick takes:

  • Angel #43 (IDW). The penultimate issue at IDW. Wait until next month for more.
  • Annihilators #2 (Marvel). Well worth pulling for the bombastic storytelling and the comedy-adventure with Rocket Raccoon.
  • Avengers Academy #11 (Marvel). Christos Gage continues to do nice work in interweaving stories about the students with stories about the adults. However, for some reason A showed less interest this month.
  • Casanova: Gula #3 (Marvel Icon). Big craziness as the protagonists and antagonists switch roles and try to out clever each other.
  • Dollhouse: Epitaphs (Dark Horse). Interesting one-shot. Fills in some gaps left from the TV series. Interested to see where they take the upcoming series. Cliff Richards and Michelle Madsen do a nice job of clearly evoking a cast of minor characters from television.
  • Generation Hope #5 (Marvel). Setting the stage for the next part of story: what to do now that the new mutants have been gathered?
  • Iceman and Angel #1 (one-shot) (Marvel). Good natured fun scripted by Brian Clevinger (Atomic Robo). Some great exchanges between Bobby and Warren.
  • I, Zombie #12 (DC/Vertigo). Nice break in the regular action with Gilbert Hernandez as guest artist.
  • Li’l Depressed Boy (Image). See below.
  • The New York Five #3 (DC/Vertigo). Still hard to believe that this series will end in one more issue.
  • Scarlet #5 (Marvel Icon). Thus ends Book One. Brian Bendis and Alex Maleev continue to get a lot right about the present cultural moment in Portland, but the series still feels like prologue.
  • Silver Surfer #2 (Marvel). Liking the story from Greg Pak.
  • Spider-Girl #5 (Marvel). I read that the series will be coming to an end in June. Too bad. On the other hand, I was considering letting go because A, for some reason, refuses to read this title.
  • Spike #6 (IDW). Ummm. Some stuff happens, and Lilah shows up at the end.
  • Sir Edward Grey, Witchfinder: Lost and Gone Forever #3 (Dark Horse). Big confrontation with Grey’s friend, and some spooky visitations. Nice Victorian Western from Mike Mignola et al.
  • Uncanny X-Force #5.1 and #6 (Marvel). Not sure why the “point one” issue is a supposed to be such a friendly entry into the series, but, in other news, I got to chat with Rick Remender at the Stumptown Comics Fest. Always nice to tell creators how much you like their work.
  • Uncanny X-Men #534 and #534.1 and Annual #3 (Marvel). Matt Fraction’s (current) run on the title ends with some smart and clever plotting. Kieron Gillen’s “point one” issue makes more sense to me as an entry point for at least people who know the central X characters than does the Uncanny X-Force issue. The Annual, whatever its merits, sets up a story that I do not intend to follow through the other issues.
  • Wolverine and Jubilee #3 (Marvel). Story gets kind of trippy, but then what did I expect with Kathryn Immonen on writing.
  • X-Men: Legacy #246 (Age of X Chapter 3), New Mutants #23 (Age of X Chapter 4), and Age of X Universe #1 (Marvel). The tension continues to build nicely in the main story. The “universe” installment is brutally cold.

Longer takes:

  • B.P.R.D.: The Dead Remembered #1 (Dark Horse). Mike Mignola and Scott Allie script a story about Liz Sherman as a teenager and ward of the B.P.R.D. Liz is alienated, angry, and jaded, which might be clichĂ©, except that we know her as an adult and can see who this kid becomes. Despite her superficial similarities to other female firestarters, like Jean Grey, Liz has always been a more self-possessed character than most women featured in super hero, or super hero-esque, books. Stylish art, as expected, from Karl Moline, Andy Owens, and Dave Stewart. (And, yes, Dark Horse suckered me into buying two copies of the first issue with the alternate covers by Jo Chen and Moline).
  • X-23 #8 (Marvel). I regret to say that with this issue I have decided to end my subscription. There have been brief moments where Marjorie Liu has used this book to tell a story about Laura/X-23, but for the most part she has seemed more like a supporting player in her own book. I think that Liu has some interesting ideas about Laura and her sense of ethics, her desire for humanity, for working through her past, but too much time is directed to servicing “events”. Making this book be the next place for Jubilee is almost interesting enough to keep pulling it, but also underscores the problem I am citing as my reason to quit. I’ll keep my eye out for trades, though.

TPBs:

Batman and Robin Reborn (DC).

Yeah, this is fun. I get why people like this series. Surprisingly compelling reboot of characters you would think were well worn, especially as a pair. But Grant Morrison and his artistic collaborators make them seem new, in part, of course by giving them new secret identities and forcing the new dynamic duo to prove themselves. I am reminded, however, as to why I don’t read that many Bat-books: Gotham is depressingly depraved.

Finder Library Volume 1 (Dark Horse).

Forthcoming.

Widowmaker (Marvel).

Forthcoming.

Hellblazer Volume 1: Original Sins (DC/Vertigo).

Another series that I am happy to see reissued as it makes it easier for me to find an entry point. Want to live with the character a little longer before writing more.

Possessions Volume 2: Ghost Table (Oni Press).

Ray Fawkes’ second installment in this series is as funny as the first. Gurgazon is still the most charming/disgusting little demon in the universe. A true all ages book for anyone who likes stories about the supernatural.

X-Men First Class Volume 2 (Marvel).

These collections are fun. Jeff Parker goes for a bright and mildly troubled view of super-powered teenager-ness, and succeeds splendidly. The artwork, by Roger Cruz, principally, in pencils and inks gets the gawkiness of the age right, but, particularly with Jean, and out of costume, can veer into figures that, like actors, look about a decade or so too old for the character’s age. Not so much an issue with the charming backups with Colleen Coover. The Marvel Girl and Scarlet Witch stories are especially enjoyable.

X-Men Forever 2 Volume 3: Perfect World (Marvel).

And with that Chris Claremont’s experiment comes to an end, I gather. As I’ve written before, I liked the loopiness of the series, but did find some elements, the willingness to kill off big characters, for example, a little tiring. I did like the resolution of the Storm/Ro/Ororo story, especially the reappearance of the mohawk.

From Bridge City Comics:

Takio (Marvel Icon).

Forthcoming.

Li’l Depressed Boy #1 and #2 (Image). Glossed over this in my news feeds, but after taking a second look, decided I would like to try it out, especially because I think A will like it (now, to get her to read it). In the opening issues S. Steven Struble and Sina Grace walk a fine line with the characters. LD does not show any of the entitlement of a Nice Guy, yet, and Jazmin is too prickly to be a full on Manic Pixie Dream Girl, but both could turn into those stereotypes.

From the Corvallis Book Bin:

Gear School (Dark Horse).

Picked this one up for A. Adam Gallardo (writer) and Nuria Peris & Sergi Sandoval (art) pack a lot of worldbuilding into a short book. Gallardo’s script is open-ended without sacrificing fulfillment of the immediate story. My primary problem with the book is that Peris and Sandoval draw the girls too old in the way that most actors who play high schoolers are actually in their 20s (or even 30s). It would have been interesting if Teresa had looked more her age instead of like a young adult. The meaning of story is confused by this artistic choice.

The Goon Volume 1: Nothin’ But Misery (Dark Horse).

Forthcoming.

Monkey vs. Robot (Top Shelf Productions).

More all ages fun. James Kolchaka writes and draws a story that can be read either as a “Spy vs. Spy” type battle and/or as an ecological fable about technology and progress. Most notably, it is easy to feel for both of the main characters at the end.

I will make a separate post of my purchases from Stumptown.

February comics

From tfaw last month:

Single issues:

Quick takes (trying a different format here):

  • Age of X Alpha (Marvel). Prologue. I like the anthology format for this character-based beginning to the cross-over (which, yes, I am going to follow).
  • Angel #41 (IDW). Another change in the art team. Sigh.
  • Atomic Robo: Deadly Art of Science #3 (Red 5). Turning into a coming of age story for Robo. Interesting, and Brian Clevinger and Scott Wegener capture the weirdness and awkwardness of the idea well.
  • Avengers Academy #8 (Marvel). I like how Christos Gage is bringing focus on the teachers as well as a the students. Adds narrative depth and texture. I do find the final page to be confusing as to who Tigra is wanting to kick out of the Academy, though.
  • Birds of Prey #9 (DC). Another month with a single group of artists. I like how Gail Simone allows Dinah to throw off her emotional paralysis by force of will. Consistent with how she writes that character.
  • B.P.R.D. – Hell on Earth: Gods #2 (Dark Horse). Rewinds to what led to the reveal at the end the first issue of this arc. And now I know that this is Guy Davis’s next to last B.P.R.D. More on that after this mini finishes.
  • Casanova: Gula #2 (Marvel Icon). Zephyr is looking to be the big bad, or primary protagonist. Family drama on a cosmic scale.
  • I, Zombie #10 (DC/Vertigo). Nice art of the UO campus.
  • Scarlet #4 (Marvel Icon). Unfolding as a big morality tale, and right now in kind of a holding pattern story-wise. Great cover by Alex Maleev.
  • Sir Edward Grey, Witchfinder: Lost & Gone Forever #1 (Dark Horse). Were-buffalo!
  • Spider-Girl #3 (Marvel). Setting up a mystery for Anya to work on. I like the conceit with Sue Richards. Not liking the way the art is unsettled.
  • Uncanny X-Men #532 (Marvel). Greg Land manages to make Emma Frost look like a third-rate Bond girl from the Roger Moore-era on the cover. Matt Fraction and Kieron Gillen’s story remains interesting.
  • X-23 #5 (Marvel). Marjorie Liu does appear to be getting to tell a story about Laura, while also finding reasons for Gambit to be hanging around. Not crazy about Ms. Sinister strutting around in stripper-wear.
  • Wolverine and Jubilee #1 (Marvel). I did not follow the vampire story leading up to this mini, but I’ll give anything Kathryn Immonen writes a try. Good use of Jubilee here as someone caught between different desires and influences.

Longer takes:

  • Angel: Illyria: Haunted #3 (IDW). Scott Tipton and Mariah Huehner regain hold of Illyria’s voice, and I continue to like how this series is exploring both the character and important pieces of the Angelverse left by the cancelation of the show. In this case, the mythology of the Deeper Well as well as of Illyria herself. Elena Casagrande (pencils & inks) and Ilaria Traversi (colors) are effective at rendering characters that walk the line between photo realism and more classic comic art. Best Angel book going right now.
  • Hellboy: The Sleeping and the Dead #2 (Dark Horse). Not destined to be a classic Hellboy tale, I think, but the conclusion does not disappoint in terms of becoming more than the set up implies. If Scott Hampton were to do more art for the series, that would take some getting used to. His work is slick and clean in a way that the series usually is not. In particular, the figures often appear to be static, less fluid. This works well for the B.P.R.D. guys telling tales at the pub, but less well when the action is unfolding. Dave Stewart shows his versatility in working in a more literal mode than is normal for Hellboy.
  • Hotwire: Deep Cut #3 (Radical Comics). Steve Pugh and Warren Ellis bring the second mini to a satisfying close with lots of action and witty commentary from Alice, who ends up outsmarting everyone. This is exactly what you would expect, but how the story gets to that point follows a jagged path, not a straight line. Best line of the issue: “So everyone gets a medal, and I’m finally getting my own private army. First we take out the astrologists, then I’m coming for the homeo-paths”.
  • Uncanny X-Force #4 (Marvel). Rick Remender and Jerome Opena bring the first arc of the series to a taught, smart close. What makes this issue particularly intelligent is how it uses the characters, and their damaged psyches, to such good effect, legitimately creating doubt about whether the original mandate for the Force would be fulfilled or not. I also think that this series is a good argument for putting together consistent creative teams, at least for the run of individual arcs (and here that includes Esad Ribic and the awesome cover art). Not just the best X-book I read. One of the best series I am pulling right now period.
  • The New York Five #1 (DC/Vertigo). Ryan Kelly draws New York beautifully. Amazing detail, but still clearly drawn by someone, making his work distinctly different from Greg Land or Scott Hampton, while still being “realistic”. Scott Pilgrim-like reintroduction of the characters is clever, and one suspects deliberate on Brian Wood’s part, as his cast is in similar positions to that of Bryan Lee O’Malley’s series (a nod to Maddy from When Fangirls Attack and 3 Chicks Review Comics for highlighting this connection on the podcast).

Lastly, Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight concluded for me last month. Read more about that here.

TPBs:

Cowboy Ninja Viking Volume Two (Image).

This second volume was not the same “can’t put it down” fun of the first. The wry asides and visual play with the multiple personalities are still there, but the story gets bogged down in too much of Grear and Nix fighting over Duncan, which is boring and sadly unimaginative. Women do think of things other than men, dudes.

Hawkeye & Mockingbird: Ghosts (Marvel).

Forthcoming.

Iron Man Noir (Marvel).

Forthcoming.

Secret Six: Cats in the Cradle (DC).

It has been clear from the beginning that Gail Simone sees Cat Man as the moral center for the team, and this collection would seem to indicate that I am not particularly invested in that idea. Thomas Blake’s “crossing of the line” only hit me to the extent that the accompanying art by J. Calafiore and Jason Wright made my stomach turn. On the other hand, the Black Alice and Ragdoll dynamic is funny and touching. John Ostrander’s “most dangerous game” take is so slight, and so broadly drawn that I’m not sure what it adds to the Six’s story. However, the collection ends with Simone’s dark, weird, and engmatic western, which elevates this trade to pretty well worth it.

The Sixth Gun Volume 1 (Oni Press).

I can see why this series is popular. Cullen Bunn’s story starts out conventionally, holder of a mystical artifact dies and it passes to an unsuspecting “innocent” who now must face her new fate. As the volume progresses, and the characters are developed, everything becomes more complicated than how it started. Brian Hurtt populates the Frontier with a host of fearsome-looking supernatural characters, but who are nonetheless recognizaeable within the framework of the Western.