May Comics

From tfaw this month:

Single issue:

Short takes:

  • Annihilators #3 (Marvel). Rocket Raccoon rules. Super powerful super beings trying to best each other is fun when done with style and in a good nature. Nice work so far to Dan Abnett, Andy Lanning, Tan Eng Huat, and Timothy Green et al for this mini.
  • Atomic Robo: Deadly Art of Science #5 (Red 5). Conclusion to the latest series, which is, if nothing else, indicative of how solid Brian Clevinger’s and Scott Wegener’s work, with Ronda Patterson and Jeff Powell, has become on this title. Funny. Smart. Action. Science. One of the most reliable reads I pull.
  • Avengers Academy #12, Avengers Academy: Giant Size #1, Avengers Academy #13 (Marvel). This trio of issues seems to have reignited A’s enthusiasm for this series. On the other hand, the “Giant Size” issue and #13 seem like stories that would have meant more before Young Allies was canceled.
  • Birds of Prey #11 (DC). A Secret Six/BoP crossover issue. Would hardly deny Gail Simone that conceit. Always like to see Helena/Huntress anchor a story.
  • B.P.R.D.: The Dead Remembered #2 (Dark Horse). This mini is developing some thoughtful character background for Liz that highlights the extent to which she is both of a generic type and distinctive at the same time. Looking forward to seeing how the historical piece is brought into the present and intertwined with Liz’s story.
  • Carbon Grey #2 (Image). The most helpful thing about this issue is the narrative summary on the inside cover. Still long on style.
  • Casanova: Gula #4 (Marvel Icon). Matt Fraction brings this arc to a gender bending conclusion (and maybe is an exception that proves the rule regarding what I write about Age of X below). Crazy James Bond-ish backup with Gabriel Ba in addition to the main story.
  • Hellboy: Buster Oakley Gets His Wish (Dark Horse). Mike Mignola adds alien abduction to the Hellboy-verse. I would like to see Kevin Nowlan on other Hellboy stories. I like that his lines are stronger than Mignola’s or Duncan Fegredo, and his figures more “realistic”, but that his Hellboy is still an homage to the character’s classic look: lanky and geometric.
  • I, Zombie #13 (DC/Vertigo). A is still enjoying this book with me, but maybe finding it harder to track as the narrative deepens. A new arc starts here, but one that builds on prior foundations. Need to wait-and-see where “The Dead Presidents” characters are headed.
  • The Li’l Depressed Boy #3 (Image). Most disappointing thing about this book so far is that A continues to resist reading it. Other than that, I am still impressed at how well Steven Struble and Sin Grace stay on the right side of the Nice Guy and the Manic Pixie Dream Girl with the two lead characters.
  • Generation Hope #6 (Marvel). Fast start to a new arc.
  • The New York Five #4 (DC/Vertigo). Done too soon.
  • S.H.I.E.L.D. Infinity (Marvel). In which Jonathan Hickman fills in some historical background to the vast story he is writing with this book. Dustin Weaver takes a break except for the cover.
  • Silver Surfer #3 (Marvel). Serves as a key turning point in the story.
  • Sir Edward Grey, Witchfinder #4 (Dark Horse). Zombies, demon dogs, a novel take on colonization of native peoples in North America. A good story.
  • Uncanny X-Force #7, #8, and #9 (Marvel). A tentative conclusion to the Weapon X/Deathlok/The World story and a couple of one-offs about personal demons (Betsy and Warren) and how things change (Magneto and Wolverine). Billy Tan works to maintain the high standard of the book, but he and Dean White’s art in #9 is more photo real than I would like to see, especially on a title that benefits from more expressionism in how it is drawn and colored.
  • Uncanny X-Men #535 and #536 (Marvel). Cool to read Kieron Gillen picking up on Joss Whedon’s Astonishing X-Men story, especially as a way to deal with Kitty’s return. Terry and Rachel Dodson are much welcomed after too, too much Greg Land.
  • Wolverine and Jubilee #4 (Marvel). Kathryn Immonen and Phil Noto bring their mini to close with some nice character moments and a story that tracks despite looking like it might have just been weird.
  • X-Men: Prelude to Schism #1 (Marvel). All prelude and build-up, which, I guess, is all that is promised, no?
  • Spider-Girl #6 and X-23 #9 (Marvel). Playing out the string with these titles. Who knows, maybe moving Jubilee and Noto to X-23 will make me change my mind about pulling that book.

Longer takes:

  • Age of X: Chapter 5 (X-Men Legacy #247), Age of X: Chapter 6 (New Mutants #24), and Age of X Universe #2 (Marvel). I suppose that it is inevitable that they pay off for these kinds of stories is never as exciting as the set up. Having written that, Mike Carey did excellent work in plotting out the story and letting unfold in a way that made sense and that told you something about the alternate universe in which the action takes place. The Universe books with The Avengers could have been better integrated into the main story. I’m not sure they tell you much of interest. What I would have liked to see is more stories like the Dazzler backup by Chuck Kim and Gabriel Hernandez Walta, which is interesting for the way it does integrate mutant and non-mutant elements of the construct in Legion’s brain, but also for the distinct art style.
  • I plan to address Angel #44, Angel: 100-Page Spectacular, Spike #7 and Spike #8 in a longer post on the IDW Angelverse.

TPBs:

DMZ Volume 10: Collective Punishment (DC/Vertigo).

Forthcoming.

Empire State: A Love Story (or Not) (Abrams). Jason Shiga’s new book is a charming work that spins the Nice Guy character by actually having him grow and making his love interest a fully actualized person with her own ideas about life. The different hues for the different lines of the narrative is an effective way to show Jimmy’s development at different stages of the story. Shiga’s art is, as always, highly expressive.

Neptune (Tug Boat Press).

Forthcoming.

Page by Paige (Amulet). I ordered Laura Lee Gulledge’s book because I thought it would be a good one to share with A, but I learned after the fact that she already had an advance copy that Anne-Marie picked up from ALA last year. So, we kind of did get to share, but not at the same time. In any event, it is hard not be drawn into Paige’s world. I appreciate how Gulledge keeps the story on the right side of sweet and precious; it seems perfect for the character. I am still thinking over many of the visual metaphors, which alternate between subtle and beautiful and pretty but ham handed. If these are meant to be Paige’s, that kind of unevenness seems appropriate. If they are meant for the reader, then that requires more assessment, I think. On the other hand, I know that it isn’t easy to come up with metaphoric imagery. In any case, a delightful book.

Secret Six: The Reptile Brain (DC).

Forthcoming.

Sleepyheads (Blank Slate Books).

Forthcoming.

Tiny Titans: Field Trippin’ (DC).

No longer the blast of pure joy it used to be, but still lots of fun. As always some of the best jokes involve parodies of the goings on in the real DCU. B’DG is adorable.

From Matt’s Cavalcade of Comics:

Rated Free for Everyone (Oni Press). One of two Free Comic Book Day offerings that I picked up from Oni. Both titles featured here have plenty of style, but not the kind of characters or stories that can still appeal to me as a an adult. I am thinking my nephew might like one or the other, though.

Spontaneous #1 (Oni Press). The more adult of the Oni titles for Free Comic Book Day. Brett Weldele’s art is plenty stylish, but Joe Harris’ story not quite enough of substance for me to decide to pull this one. Trade/wait, I think.

Top Shelf Kids Club (Top Shelf). Fun. Fun. Fun. Works in ways that the Oni all ages book doesn’t. Another great Johnny Boo from James Kolchaka, and I always enjoy having a reason to see another of Christian Slade’s Korgi and Andy Runton’s Owly.

The Dead Boy Detectives (DC/Vertigo).

Forthcoming.

Jenny Finn: Doom Messiah (BOOM! Studios).

A title I’ve thought about reading and would pick up a lot and finally did purchase on Free Comic Book Day. Looks and feels like an out of place B.P.R.D. or Hellboy mini, which is to say that it is pulp-y fun, but I will admit to hoping for something … different. My biggest problem, though, is with the lettering in chapters 1-2, which is tiny.

From comiXology:

Madman: Oddity #1 and #2 (Image). Don’t know why I’ve overlooked this awesomeness from Michael Allred before, but I am happy that it is available digitally for me to read. Crazy, but low-key, existential fun and wry commentary on superheroes. More when I finish the mini.

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