April comics

From tfaw last month:

Single issues:

Quick takes:

  • Angel #43 (IDW). The penultimate issue at IDW. Wait until next month for more.
  • Annihilators #2 (Marvel). Well worth pulling for the bombastic storytelling and the comedy-adventure with Rocket Raccoon.
  • Avengers Academy #11 (Marvel). Christos Gage continues to do nice work in interweaving stories about the students with stories about the adults. However, for some reason A showed less interest this month.
  • Casanova: Gula #3 (Marvel Icon). Big craziness as the protagonists and antagonists switch roles and try to out clever each other.
  • Dollhouse: Epitaphs (Dark Horse). Interesting one-shot. Fills in some gaps left from the TV series. Interested to see where they take the upcoming series. Cliff Richards and Michelle Madsen do a nice job of clearly evoking a cast of minor characters from television.
  • Generation Hope #5 (Marvel). Setting the stage for the next part of story: what to do now that the new mutants have been gathered?
  • Iceman and Angel #1 (one-shot) (Marvel). Good natured fun scripted by Brian Clevinger (Atomic Robo). Some great exchanges between Bobby and Warren.
  • I, Zombie #12 (DC/Vertigo). Nice break in the regular action with Gilbert Hernandez as guest artist.
  • Li’l Depressed Boy (Image). See below.
  • The New York Five #3 (DC/Vertigo). Still hard to believe that this series will end in one more issue.
  • Scarlet #5 (Marvel Icon). Thus ends Book One. Brian Bendis and Alex Maleev continue to get a lot right about the present cultural moment in Portland, but the series still feels like prologue.
  • Silver Surfer #2 (Marvel). Liking the story from Greg Pak.
  • Spider-Girl #5 (Marvel). I read that the series will be coming to an end in June. Too bad. On the other hand, I was considering letting go because A, for some reason, refuses to read this title.
  • Spike #6 (IDW). Ummm. Some stuff happens, and Lilah shows up at the end.
  • Sir Edward Grey, Witchfinder: Lost and Gone Forever #3 (Dark Horse). Big confrontation with Grey’s friend, and some spooky visitations. Nice Victorian Western from Mike Mignola et al.
  • Uncanny X-Force #5.1 and #6 (Marvel). Not sure why the “point one” issue is a supposed to be such a friendly entry into the series, but, in other news, I got to chat with Rick Remender at the Stumptown Comics Fest. Always nice to tell creators how much you like their work.
  • Uncanny X-Men #534 and #534.1 and Annual #3 (Marvel). Matt Fraction’s (current) run on the title ends with some smart and clever plotting. Kieron Gillen’s “point one” issue makes more sense to me as an entry point for at least people who know the central X characters than does the Uncanny X-Force issue. The Annual, whatever its merits, sets up a story that I do not intend to follow through the other issues.
  • Wolverine and Jubilee #3 (Marvel). Story gets kind of trippy, but then what did I expect with Kathryn Immonen on writing.
  • X-Men: Legacy #246 (Age of X Chapter 3), New Mutants #23 (Age of X Chapter 4), and Age of X Universe #1 (Marvel). The tension continues to build nicely in the main story. The “universe” installment is brutally cold.

Longer takes:

  • B.P.R.D.: The Dead Remembered #1 (Dark Horse). Mike Mignola and Scott Allie script a story about Liz Sherman as a teenager and ward of the B.P.R.D. Liz is alienated, angry, and jaded, which might be cliché, except that we know her as an adult and can see who this kid becomes. Despite her superficial similarities to other female firestarters, like Jean Grey, Liz has always been a more self-possessed character than most women featured in super hero, or super hero-esque, books. Stylish art, as expected, from Karl Moline, Andy Owens, and Dave Stewart. (And, yes, Dark Horse suckered me into buying two copies of the first issue with the alternate covers by Jo Chen and Moline).
  • X-23 #8 (Marvel). I regret to say that with this issue I have decided to end my subscription. There have been brief moments where Marjorie Liu has used this book to tell a story about Laura/X-23, but for the most part she has seemed more like a supporting player in her own book. I think that Liu has some interesting ideas about Laura and her sense of ethics, her desire for humanity, for working through her past, but too much time is directed to servicing “events”. Making this book be the next place for Jubilee is almost interesting enough to keep pulling it, but also underscores the problem I am citing as my reason to quit. I’ll keep my eye out for trades, though.

TPBs:

Batman and Robin Reborn (DC).

Yeah, this is fun. I get why people like this series. Surprisingly compelling reboot of characters you would think were well worn, especially as a pair. But Grant Morrison and his artistic collaborators make them seem new, in part, of course by giving them new secret identities and forcing the new dynamic duo to prove themselves. I am reminded, however, as to why I don’t read that many Bat-books: Gotham is depressingly depraved.

Finder Library Volume 1 (Dark Horse).

Forthcoming.

Widowmaker (Marvel).

Forthcoming.

Hellblazer Volume 1: Original Sins (DC/Vertigo).

Another series that I am happy to see reissued as it makes it easier for me to find an entry point. Want to live with the character a little longer before writing more.

Possessions Volume 2: Ghost Table (Oni Press).

Ray Fawkes’ second installment in this series is as funny as the first. Gurgazon is still the most charming/disgusting little demon in the universe. A true all ages book for anyone who likes stories about the supernatural.

X-Men First Class Volume 2 (Marvel).

These collections are fun. Jeff Parker goes for a bright and mildly troubled view of super-powered teenager-ness, and succeeds splendidly. The artwork, by Roger Cruz, principally, in pencils and inks gets the gawkiness of the age right, but, particularly with Jean, and out of costume, can veer into figures that, like actors, look about a decade or so too old for the character’s age. Not so much an issue with the charming backups with Colleen Coover. The Marvel Girl and Scarlet Witch stories are especially enjoyable.

X-Men Forever 2 Volume 3: Perfect World (Marvel).

And with that Chris Claremont’s experiment comes to an end, I gather. As I’ve written before, I liked the loopiness of the series, but did find some elements, the willingness to kill off big characters, for example, a little tiring. I did like the resolution of the Storm/Ro/Ororo story, especially the reappearance of the mohawk.

From Bridge City Comics:

Takio (Marvel Icon).

Forthcoming.

Li’l Depressed Boy #1 and #2 (Image). Glossed over this in my news feeds, but after taking a second look, decided I would like to try it out, especially because I think A will like it (now, to get her to read it). In the opening issues S. Steven Struble and Sina Grace walk a fine line with the characters. LD does not show any of the entitlement of a Nice Guy, yet, and Jazmin is too prickly to be a full on Manic Pixie Dream Girl, but both could turn into those stereotypes.

From the Corvallis Book Bin:

Gear School (Dark Horse).

Picked this one up for A. Adam Gallardo (writer) and Nuria Peris & Sergi Sandoval (art) pack a lot of worldbuilding into a short book. Gallardo’s script is open-ended without sacrificing fulfillment of the immediate story. My primary problem with the book is that Peris and Sandoval draw the girls too old in the way that most actors who play high schoolers are actually in their 20s (or even 30s). It would have been interesting if Teresa had looked more her age instead of like a young adult. The meaning of story is confused by this artistic choice.

The Goon Volume 1: Nothin’ But Misery (Dark Horse).

Forthcoming.

Monkey vs. Robot (Top Shelf Productions).

More all ages fun. James Kolchaka writes and draws a story that can be read either as a “Spy vs. Spy” type battle and/or as an ecological fable about technology and progress. Most notably, it is easy to feel for both of the main characters at the end.

I will make a separate post of my purchases from Stumptown.

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